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All Indicators for Postadoption LMB

Serial #
Indicator
1
Caseworkers and child welfare professionals report unmet needs of children and families due to lack of service availability.
2
Caseworkers and child welfare professionals report unmet needs of children and families due to lack of service availability within a reasonable distance from the families and children needing the services.
3
Caseworkers and child welfare professionals report unmet needs of children and families due to eligibility limitations (e.g., services are available in area, but families and children on their caseloads cannot access them because they do not meet eligibility requirements).
4
Mental, behavioral, emotional, and physical health providers report unmet needs of children and families due to eligibility limitations.
5
Mental, behavioral, emotional, and physical health providers report unmet needs of children and families due to lack of service availability.
6
Mental, behavioral, emotional, and physical health providers report unmet needs of children and families due to lack of service availability within a reasonable distance from the families and children needing the services.
7
Court personnel report unmet needs of children and families due to a lack of service availability.
8
Court personnel report unmet needs of children and families due to lack of service availability within a reasonable distance from the families and children needing their services.
9
Court personnel report unmet needs of children and families due to eligibility limitations.
10
Educational institutions (e.g., schools of social work) have adoption and postadoption related information in their curricula.
11
Students in educational institutions learn about the postadoption needs of children and families.
12
Educational institutions (e.g., schools of social work) have increasing opportunities for students to gain practical experience in the fields of foster care and adoption.
13
Policymakers and administrators have reviewed AFCARS data for adoption trends in their jurisdictions.
14
Families have increased awareness of postadoption services in their communities.
15
Policymakers and administrators are aware of the most requested postadoption services for members of the adoption triad.
16
Policymakers and administrators are aware of funding streams to fund postadoption service delivery.
17
Policymakers and administrators can identify gaps in postadoption services for triad members in their jurisdictions.
18
Policymakers understand the links between availability of postadoption services and placement stability.
19
Financial need is not a barrier to accessing needed services for children who are adopted.
20
Adoptive parents/families have accessed services to meet the needs of their children who are adopted.
21
Adoptive parents/families report that eligibility is not a barrier to accessing needed services for their children who are adopted.
22
Needed adoption-related services are available in the community.
23
Increasing numbers of older children from the foster care system are placed with families who can meet their needs.
24
Increasing numbers of adoptions of older children from the foster care system are finalized with families who can meet their needs.
25
Caseworkers and child welfare professionals are able to meet the postadoption needs of children and families with services available within a reasonable distance from their homes.
26
Caseworkers and child welfare professionals report increased numbers of children and families are accessing needed services.
27
Caseworkers and child welfare professionals report children and families are eligible for needed postadoption services.
28
Mental, behavioral, emotional, and physical health providers report children and families being eligible for needed postadoption services.
29
Mental, behavioral, emotional, and physical health providers are able to meet the postadoption needs of children and families with services available within a reasonable distance from their homes.
30
Mental, behavioral, emotional, and physical health providers report increased numbers of children and families accessing needed postadoption services.
31
Court personnel report that the postadoption service needs of children and families are met with services available within reasonable distance from their homes.
32
Increasing numbers of court personnel are more supportive of older child adoption.
33
Court personnel report children and families being eligible for needed postadoption services.
34
Birth parents/families receiving services from recently graduated students of educational institutions are satisfied with the quality of services.
35
Private and public agencies report that graduates of schools of social work have necessary skills to deliver adoption-competent services to children and families.
36
Adopted youth/adults receiving services from recently graduated students of educational institutions are satisfied with the quality of services.
37
Families receiving services from recently graduated students of educational institutions are satisfied with the quality of services.
38
Services are created to meet the needs of all members of the adoption triad.
39
Increasing numbers of families access available postadoption services in their areas.
40
Adoption and related professionals are aware of postadoption services in their area.
41
Funding is available for a comprehensive service array of needed postadoption services in a specified region.
42
Families receive culturally competent postadoption services when they need them.
43
Families are willing to adopt children from foster care due to knowledge of supportive, culturally competent postadoption services available in their area.
44
An increasing number of families choose to adopt children from foster care in a given region.
45
Caseworkers are aware of where and whom to go to in order to advocate for meeting the unmet services needs of their clients (funding sources, potential service providers, etc.).
46
Caseworkers can identify at least one unmet service need of adoption triad members with whom they are working.
47
Caseworkers are aware of needed changes in laws or policy necessary to meet client's service needs.
48
Additional community resources are developed to support triad members in search and reunion efforts.
49
There is a documented increase in utilization of State reunion registries.
50
There is increased access to adoption records by adult adopted people.
51
Mental/behavioral/emotional/physical health providers use adoption-sensitive language in their work with all triad members (or are able to give examples of instances when they used adoption-sensitive language).
52
Mental/behavioral/emotional/physical health providers conduct client assessments in an adoption-competent manner.
53
Mental/behavioral/emotional/physical health providers use adoption-competent interventions and strategies with all triad members.
54
Birth parents learn about appropriate interactions.
55
Birth parents understand the importance of setting and maintaining appropriate boundaries.
56
Birth parents can talk about their roles as nonparenting parents.
57
Birth family members understand the importance of setting and maintaining appropriate boundaries.
58
Birth family members can talk about different roles and responsibilities within the family unit.
59
Birth family members can talk about the role they want to play in the life of the adopted child.
60
Birth family members learn about appropriate interactions.
61
Birth family members learn healthy ways to communicate with birth parents regarding their feelings about the adoption.
62
Birth family members can talk about their feelings about the adoptive placement.
63
Birth family members learn healthy conflict resolution skills.
64
Birth parents increasingly accept their role as nonparenting parents.
65
Birth parents observe appropriate boundaries.
66
Birth parents increasingly accept the decision to make an adoption plan for their child.
67
Birth family members use healthy communication skills.
68
Birth family members feel respected and supported by members of the extended birth family.
69
Birth family members use conflict resolution skills.
70
Birth family members report open communication among family members.
71
Birth family members observe appropriate boundaries.
72
Extended birth family members support birth parents in their role as nonparenting parents.
73
Birth family members work to manage/resolve conflict in an open and healthy way.
74
Parents know about activities (support groups, email listservs, etc.) that can connect them with other birth parents.
75
Parents can identify specific activities that will connect them with other birth families and fit within their schedules and lifestyle.
76
Parents can identify specific ways in which connecting with other birth parents can be helpful to them.
77
Birth parents can give an example of how their intimate relationships may have been affected by their loss
78
Birth parents are familiar with the seven core issues of adoption and how they may affect their future relationships if not successfully resolved.
79
Birth parents learn about the importance of developing high quality relationships among family members.
80
Birth parents/family can identify existing supportive relationships.
81
Birth parents can identify other sources of support available in their community (i.e., faith community, support groups, etc.).
82
Birth parents learn techniques for strengthening relationships.
83
Birth parents receive specific benefits from connecting with other birth parents.
84
Birth parents access activities that connect them with other birth parents and fit with their schedules and lifestyles.
85
Birth parents feel a decreased sense of isolation/increased sense of support.
86
Birth parents are able to talk about how their loss may have impacted their intimate relationships in the past.
87
Birth parents feel a decreased sense of isolation.
88
Birth parents are in healthy intimate relationships.
89
Birth parents report strengthened relationships with other family members.
90
Birth parents use techniques to strengthen their relationships/maintain high quality relationships.
91
Birth parents feel supported by their family and community.
92
Birth parents access other sources of support in their communities (i.e., faith community, support groups, etc.).
93
Birth parents understand effective techniques for stress management.
94
Birth parents understand effective coping skills.
95
Birth parents understand effective techniques for anger management.
96
Birth parents understand the use of humor as a stress/coping mechanism.
97
Birth parents can talk about the issues of loss associated with adoption.
98
Birth parents understand adoption for adopted children and adoptive parents.
99
Birth parents understand common reactions when grieving the loss of a child placed for adoption.
100
Birth parents understand the stages of grief.
101
Birth parents understand the connection between contact with birth children and lower levels of grief.
102
Birth parents understand secondary loss.
103
Birth parents understand the concept of ambiguous loss.
104
Birth parents understand common reactions to trauma associated with adoption loss.
105
Birth parents learn about how loss associated with adoption can cause trauma.
106
Birth parents learn about resources and services that can help them work through trauma associated with adoption loss.
107
Birth parents can identify stressful/difficult situations.
108
Birth parents use fewer ineffective coping/stress management skills.
109
Birth parents use effective coping/stress management skills when facing difficult situations.
110
Birth parents use humor as a stress/coping mechanism.
111
Birth parents report improved emotional well-being.
112
Birth parents use appropriate strategies to address their own feelings of grief and loss associated with adoption.
113
Birth parents create rituals/traditions as needed to acknowledge the adoptive placement.
114
Birth parents access support groups and adoption-competent therapists as needed.
115
Birth parents report a lessening of grief and loss.
116
Birth parents report improved self-esteem.
117
Birth parents report lower levels of trauma symptoms.
118
Birth parents access services and supports to help them work through trauma.
119
Birth parents take appropriate steps to address symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), if necessary.
120
Therapists working with birth parents report that birth parents exhibit lower levels of trauma.
121
Birth parents understand the impact of adoption on birth parents/family members.
122
Birth parents can talk about the lifelong implications of forming a family through adoption.
123
Birth parents understand issues of loss associated with placing a child for adoption.
124
Birth parents understand the impact of adoption on children and adults.
125
Birth parents understand how placing a child can trigger identity issues for birth parents.
126
Birth parents learn strategies for talking about adoption with their children at different developmental stages.
127
Birth parents learn about the kinds of questions to expect from adopted children at different ages/developmental stages.
128
Birth parents understand how children's comprehension of adoption changes at different ages/developmental stages.
129
Birth parents can talk about the circumstances of and their feelings surrounding the adoption to their children.
130
Birth parents learn developmentally appropriate strategies to explain their adoption decision to their children.
131
Birth parents learn ways to respond to intrusive questions about adoption from others.
132
Birth parents learn how to establish privacy parameters regarding discussions of adoption.
133
Birth parents prepare to answer questions from their children about the circumstances that led to the adoption, birth family history, and medical history.
134
Birth parents learn ways to maintain boundaries related to adoption disclosure, according to their comfort level.
135
Birth parents develop ongoing rituals and traditions to acknowledge the adoptive placement over time.
136
Birth parents take time to grieve their losses and begin to work towards acceptance.
137
Birth parents report a greater sense of well-being.
138
Birth parents develop a support system.
139
Therapists working with birth parents report that birth parents have a greater sense of well-being.
140
Birth parents use language that feels comfortable to all involved when discussing adoption with children.
141
Birth parents can respond to their children's questions about adoption, birth family history, medical history, etc.
142
Birth parents use different methods to discuss adoption, depending on a child's age/developmental stage.
143
Birth parents use different methods to discuss adoption with any previous or subsequent birth children the birth parent may have, appropriate to a child's age/developmental stage.
144
The adopted person reports that his or her questions about the adoption and birth family are answered.
145
Birth parents respond to questions from their children about the adoption, birth family history, and/or medical history.
146
Birth parents maintain boundaries related to adoption disclosure, according to their comfort level.
147
Birth parents have techniques for responding to intrusive questions about adoption from others.
148
Birth parents develop and use appropriate privacy parameters.
149
Adoptive parents understand what constitutes high quality child care (child-safe facility, low child-staff ratio, nurturing and positive caregiver, developmentally appropriate activities and toys, intellectually stimulating environment, etc.).
150
Adoptive parents know about the different child care options available to them.
151
Adoptive parents know about resources available to help them find child care providers (e.g., child care locators, State Office for Children, adoptive parent groups, etc.).
152
Adoptive parents understand child care options for children with special physical, developmental, or mental/emotional needs.
153
Adoptive parents know about financial resources that may be available to help them defray costs of child care.
154
Adoptive parents know about red flags to look for when selecting a child care provider.
155
Adoptive parents know about developmentally appropriate behaviors and skills and develop realistic expectations for their children according to each child's needs.
156
Adoptive parents know about positive, nonviolent discipline techniques appropriate to each child's needs (e.g., age, physical and cognitive developmental levels, etc.).
157
Adoptive parents know about the benefits of using praise and positive reinforcement to encourage positive behaviors.
158
Adoptive parents know about the importance of maintaining consistency in discipline, rule setting, and routines.
159
Adoptive parents understand the negative impact of using corporal punishment and other coercive methods.
160
Adoptive parents know about appropriate consequences for negative behaviors, appropriate to their child's needs.
161
Adoptive parents report that the adopted children or youth are making progress in their home.
162
Adoptive parents know about ways to help stimulate their children's development and learning.
163
Adoptive parents know about the signs of possible developmental delays and know when to discuss concerns about their children's development with a pediatrician.
164
Adoptive parents' stated expectations of their children are realistic for children of that age/developmental level.
165
Adoptive parents understand the effect the adoption has on children's emotional and mental development.
166
Adoptive parents know about typical child development and the unique needs of their child(ren).
167
Adoptive parents understand the impact early experiences with trauma/neglect can have on child development.
168
Adoptive parents know about the major developmental milestones and when children typically achieve them.
169
Children are provided with a safe, stimulating environment, developmentally appropriate activities and toys, and positive interactions with their child care provider and other children under the provider's care.
170
Adoptive parents are satisfied with the quality of child care their children receive.
171
Adoptive parents occasionally drop in for unannounced visits to their children.
172
Adoptive parents maintain regular communication with their child care provider.
173
Adoptive parents access available financial resources to help defray the costs of child care.
174
Adoptive parents quickly address any concerns about their children's care with the caregiver.
175
Adoptive parents have specific examples of how children or youth are making progress in their home.
176
Adoptive parents praise their children's positive behaviors and regularly offer encouragement and positive reinforcement.
177
Adoptive parents consistently use positive, age-appropriate discipline techniques (that do not include corporal punishment) in interactions with their children.
178
Adoptive parents are consistent in enforcement of developmentally appropriate household rules, following routines, and disciplining children.
179
Adoptive parents clearly communicate their expectations about behavior and rules to their children.
180
Adoptive parents do not use corporal punishment or other coercive methods to punish children.
181
Adoptive parents have examples of nonviolent consequences they have enforced when children do not follow the rules.
182
Adoptive parents can name the developmental milestones their children have reached.
183
Adoptive parents provide developmentally appropriate toys and activities to help stimulate their children's intellectual and social development.
184
Adoptive parents interact with their children in a positive and supportive way.
185
Adoptive parents discuss any concerns about their children's development with their pediatrician and access services as necessary.
186
Adoptive parents establish and follow predictable, consistent household routines and rules.
187
Adoptive parents have examples of how their children achieved realistic expectations for children of that age/developmental level.
188
Adoptive parents have examples of developmentally appropriate toys and activities they have used to help stimulate their children's intellectual and social development.
189
Adoptive parents understand the importance of "claiming" their adopted children as their "own children."
190
Adoptive parents understand the concept of "entitlement" and its importance to positive adoptive family development.
191
Adoptive parents know about ways to integrate the children into existing family routines and create new rituals and traditions with the children.
192
Adoptive parents understand ways to help the adopted children feel like part of the family.
193
Adoptive parents report that they received positive support for the adoption from their family and friends.
194
Adoptive parents say they are committed to the children.
195
Adoptive parents understand the need to be flexible, tolerant, patient, unconditionally loving, and maintaining a sense of humor.
196
Adoptive parents understand the importance of providing opportunities for the child to interact with same- and opposite-sex role models.
197
Adoptive parents understand the importance of providing opportunities for their child to interact with people who are members of the child's race or culture.
198
Adoptive parents parented this child as a foster child prior to adoption.
199
Adoptive parents learn ways to help their child respond to questions or comments they may encounter as a result of the child's differences from the family.
200
Adoptive parents understand the unique needs of parenting a child who is of a race or culture different than their own.
201
Adoptive parents take time to grieve their losses through infertility and begin to work towards acceptance.
202
Adoptive parents feel fully committed to adoption and to their adopted child.
203
Adoptive parents take time to grieve their losses of not having the opportunity to parent their child at earlier developmental stages.
204
Adoptive parents feel more empathy for their child's losses because of their own experience in dealing with their losses.
205
Adoptive parents use positive language when talking about adoption.
206
Adoptive parents can give examples of ways they have responded to questions about adoption and their family at different stages in their child's life.
207
Adoptive parents learn techniques for helping their child develop a sense of belonging.
208
Adoptive parents understand the importance of incorporating the child into existing family traditions and creating new traditions and rituals with the child.
209
Adoptive parents learn the importance of allowing their child to have a role in decision-making.
210
Adoptive parents know where to locate services and supports that can help their child work through issues related to traumatic experiences.
211
Adoptive parents understand age/developmentally appropriate techniques for discussing/addressing trauma issues with their child.
212
Adoptive parents understand the need for predictability and consistency in household routines, rules, caregivers, etc.
213
Adoptive parents understand the ways traumatic experiences can impact adopted children at different ages/developmental stages.
214
Adoptive parents understand the causes of trauma in adopted children (e.g., separation, abuse, neglect, loss).
215
Adoptive parents and family members understand the benefits of establishing a daily routine that maintains family organization while being sufficiently flexible.
216
Adoptive parents understand how to clearly communicate rules and expectations to their children.
217
Adoptive parents understand the importance of creating an environment of predictability and consistency for children who have experienced trauma and loss.
218
Adoptive parents and family members learn age-appropriate organizational skills.
219
Adoptive parents create family rituals and traditions with the adopted child and other family members.
220
Adoptive parents can give examples of ways that their adopted child accepts and believes that he/she is a member of the family.
221
Adoptive parents give the adopted child a chance to participate in family decisions as developmentally/age appropriate.
222
The adopted child reports an increased sense of belonging in the family.
223
Adoptive parents use age/developmentally appropriate techniques for discussing/addressing trauma issues with their child.
224
Adoptive parents establish and follow predictable, consistent household routines and rules.
225
Adoptive parents access services and supports that can help their child work through issues related to traumatic experiences.
226
Adoptive parents report a decrease in crisis episodes.
227
Children can talk about consequences of not following the rules.
228
Children can talk about their parents' expectations and rules on what behavior is and is not acceptable.
229
Adoptive parents and family members use age-appropriate organizational skills.
230
Adoptive parents establish and follow predictable meal time, homework, bed time, and other necessary routines.
231
The adopted child/youth knows the location and status of any siblings.
232
Adoptive parents understand the importance of developing/maintaining sibling relationships.
233
The adopted child/youth knows that siblings are safe.
234
Adoptive parents and family members learn strategies for dealing with children who have different amounts (or quality) of relationships/ongoing contact with birth family members.
235
Adoptive parents are able to identify obstacles to sibling visitation/contact and develop plans to overcome them (as appropriate).
236
Adoptive parents learn strategies to communicate and cope with all their children's issues/needs related to sibling relationships.
237
Adoptive parents learn about options for providing opportunities for fun and positive interactions among siblings to promote attachment.
238
Children learn about alternatives to physical aggression in response to sibling contact.
239
Adoptive parents learn strategies for managing sibling conflict/rivalry.
240
Adoptive parents understand sources/causes of sibling conflict/rivalry.
241
Children learn skills to resolve their own disputes when possible.
242
Adoptive parents understand the importance of spending frequent, one-on-one time with each child.
243
Adoptive parents learn about children's emotions related to sibling relationships (e.g., "survivor guilt," divided loyalties, intense emotions following visitation).
244
Adoptive parents learn skills to support the adopted child in dealing with emotions related to sibling relationships/interactions.
245
Siblings placed separately maintain ongoing and positive contact.
246
Adoptive parents identify obstacles to sibling visitation/contact and utilize strategies to overcome them.
247
Plans for sibling contact are established and reviewed/revised at least annually.
248
Sibling relationships help to support the adopted child/youth's knowledge of cultural, personal, and/or family history.
249
Adoptive parents support adopted child/youth in searching/reuniting with siblings from whom he or she has been separated.
250
Adoptive parents use strategies for dealing with children who have different amounts (or quality) of relationships/ongoing contact with birth family members.
251
Siblings spend more time together.
252
Adopted child develops secure attachments to siblings.
253
Adopted child views siblings as a source of support and nurture.
254
Adoptive parents use effective strategies for dealing with children who have different amounts (or quality) of relationships/ongoing contact with birth family members.
255
Adoptive parents provide opportunities for fun and positive interactions among siblings to promote attachment.
256
Children resolve their own disputes when possible.
257
Adoptive parents promote reciprocity among children.
258
Families report reduced physical aggression among siblings.
259
Families report increased warmth in sibling relationships.
260
Adoptive parents spend meaningful one-on-one time with each child.
261
Adoptive parents use effective strategies for managing sibling conflict/rivalry.
262
Adoptive parents empathize with their children's thoughts and feelings about their sibling relationships.
263
Adoptive parents encourage children to share their thoughts and feelings about their sibling relationships.
264
Adoptive parents have examples of ways they have acknowledged their children's thoughts and feelings about their sibling relationships.
265
Adoptive parents and children can identity strategies for avoiding out-of-home placements.
266
Adoptive parents and children learn strategies for preventing or reducing crisis episodes.
267
Adoptive parents and children learn strategies for problem resolution.
268
Adoptive parents have increased commitment to managing their child's problems.
269
Adoptive family members can talk about different roles and responsibilities within the family unit.
270
Adoptive family members learn about appropriate interactions.
271
Adoptive family members understand the importance of setting and maintaining appropriate boundaries.
272
Adoptive parents identify activities that are age appropriate and fun for all family members.
273
Adoptive parents identify ways to spend sufficient time with their children to support healthy relationships.
274
Adoptive family members learn age-appropriate techniques for strengthening relationships.
275
Adoptive family members learn about the importance of developing high quality relationships among family members.
276
Adoptive family members learn age-appropriate, effective communication methods.
277
Adoptive family members learn methods for communicating about and resolving conflicts.
278
Adoptive family members understand the benefits of establishing a daily routine that maintains family organization while being sufficiently flexible.
279
Adoptive family members learn age-appropriate organizational skills.
280
Family members learn age-appropriate, effective coping skills.
281
Family members learn age-appropriate problem-solving skills.
282
Family members can identify family strengths and strategize ways that these strengths can enhance family functioning.
283
Adoptive family learns ways of advocating for child/family.
284
Adoptive family learns about available community/adoption-related resources.
285
Adoptive family understands basic budgeting and financial management skills.
286
Adoptive parents understand the importance of maintaining a safe, clean home for their family.
287
Adoptive parents access training and support for basic life skills (household management, budgeting, etc.) to support their families.
288
Adoptive parents can identify and pursue job training and appropriate career opportunities to provide adequate income to support their family.
289
The adoptive family experiences increased cohesion and well-being.
290
Out-of-home placements are minimized.
291
Child behavior problems are reduced.
292
Families use more effective strategies for problem resolution.
293
Family experiences a reduction in crisis episodes.
294
There is a lower rate of adoption dissolutions than average in the State.
295
Adoptive parents maintain appropriate leadership and decision-making skills within the family unit.
296
Adoptive family members are observed maintaining appropriate boundaries.
297
Parental dyad is strengthened.
298
Adoptive family demonstrates appropriate sibling relationships.
299
Adoptive family demonstrates appropriate parent-child interactions.
300
Family demonstrates a functional relationship within the parental dyad.
301
Adoptive parents have techniques for strengthening their relationships/maintaining a high quality relationship.
302
Adoptive parents and children have techniques for strengthening/maintaining a high quality parent-child relationship.
303
Adoptive parents have examples of how they support children in developing and maintaining strong sibling relationships.
304
Adoptive family members spend time together participating in age-appropriate and fun activities.
305
Adoptive parents have adequate time to spend with their children.
306
Adoptive family members have examples of how they resolved conflicts.
307
Adoptive family members communicate effectively about conflicts.
308
Adoptive family can tap into strengths and resources to manage stress/crisis.
309
Adoptive family uses appropriate coping and stress management skills during times of stress/crisis.
310
Family members have examples of how they effectively managed stress or solved a problem in their family.
311
Adoptive family uses effective problem-solving skills in times of stress/crisis.
312
Adoptive parents advocate for the needs of their child/family.
313
Adoptive family can access available community/adoption-related resources.
314
Adoptive family has a basic household budget that is realistic and covers the family's basic expenses/needs.
315
Adoptive family has a safe, clean place to live.
316
Adoptive family members have affordable and available transportation to daily activities (job, school, doctor's appointments, etc.).
317
Adoptive parents have sufficient employment to provide adequate income with which to support the family.
318
Adopted person understands the additional layers of identity formation for individuals who are adopted.
319
Adopted person learns about the concept of claiming.
320
Adopted person understands the importance of rituals and traditions that acknowledge the adoption in a positive way.
321
Adopted person can identify rituals and traditions established to acknowledge adoption in a positive way or can identify ways in which to develop new rituals and traditions in his or her current life.
322
Adopted person understands the ways in which he/she may possess qualities/talents of both birth and adoptive family members.
323
Adopted person can identify signs of secure attachment and signs of attachment difficulties.
324
Adopted person can identify strategies or techniques his/her adoptive parents may have used to strengthen attachment.
325
Adopted person can identify issues or circumstances in his/her childhood/adolescence that may have impacted his/her attachment to adoptive family members.
326
Adopted person can talk about a basic understanding of principles of attachment.
327
Adopted person can talk about the issues of grief associated with adoption for all members of the adoption triad.
328
Adopted person can talk about the ways in which his/her adopted family members might have experienced grief/loss.
329
Adopted person can talk about the specific ways in which he/she might have experienced and/or expressed grief in childhood/adolescence.
330
Adopted person understands that feelings of grief and loss associated with adoption are normal.
331
Adopted person can talk about the ways in which his/her birth parents might have experienced grief/loss.
332
Adopted person can identify strategies that can be beneficial in addressing grief and loss associated with adoption.
333
Adopted person can talk about the ways in which certain life events (Mother's Day, becoming a parent, etc.) can trigger feelings of grief and loss related to adoption.
334
Adopted person understands the ways in which traumatic experiences might have impacted him/her at different ages/developmental stages.
335
Adopted person understands the causes of trauma in adopted children (e.g., separation, abuse, neglect, loss).
336
Adopted person can identify ways in which past trauma may be impacting current life.
337
Adopted person knows where to locate services and supports that can be helpful in working through issues related to traumatic experiences.
338
Adopted person understands the impact of the ways family members responded to questions or comments encountered as a result of the adopted person's differences from the adoptive family.
339
Adopted person understands the impact of having (or not having) role models of the same and opposite sex during childhood/adolescence.
340
Adopted person understands the impact of having (or not having) interactions with people of his/her same race/culture during childhood/adolescence.
341
Adopted person understands the ways in which being of a different or the same race or culture than adoptive family members impacted him/her.
342
Adopted person understands the value of using adoption language that is comfortable for all involved.
343
Adopted person develops an enhanced understanding of how a sense of belonging and claiming within the adoptive family impacted his/her identity formation.
344
Adopted person uses rituals and traditions to acknowledge their adoption in a positive way.
345
Adopted person can identify ways in which adoption impacted his/her identity formation.
346
Adopted person uses his/her lifebook/map/video to better understand how his/her past shaped his/her current identity.
347
Adopted person attributes positive qualities/talents he/she possesses from both birth and adoptive families.
348
Adopted person can talk about current or past relationships that may have been impacted by attachment issues.
349
Adopted person accesses services and supports to help with attachment issues as needed.
350
Adopted person uses his/her lifebook/map/video to better understand how his/her past shaped his/her current attachment to his/her adoptive family.
351
Adopted person learns techniques to address attachment issues in current and future relationships.
352
Adopted person is able to anticipate life events that may trigger increased feelings of grief and loss.
353
Adopted person uses appropriate strategies to address his/her own feelings of grief and loss associated with adoption.
354
Adopted person uses his/her lifebook/map/video to better understand and grieve past losses in his/her life.
355
Adopted person is able to accept feelings of grief and loss as normal parts of the adoption experience.
356
Adopted person can identify events/situations which trigger trauma reactions/symptoms.
357
Adopted person can identify specific symptoms/ways in which past trauma impacts his/her current life.
358
Adopted person reports a decrease in crisis episodes.
359
Adopted person uses specific techniques to address impacts of trauma or cope with stressful/trigger situations.
360
Adopted person uses his/her lifebook/map/video to better understand past trauma.
361
Adopted person interacts regularly in positive ways with people of the same race/culture.
362
Adopted person can respond to questions or comments encountered as a result of his/her differences from adoptive family in a way that is comfortable.
363
Adopted person can identify same- and opposite-sex role models in current life.
364
Adopted person uses his/her lifebook/map/video to better understand how he/she was impacted by adoption into this particular family.
365
Adopted person uses adoption language that is comfortable for him/her and all involved.
366
Adopted person can identify issues or barriers associated with discussing search and reunion with adoptive family members.
367
Adopted person can identify the benefits of learning more about birth family members or reconnecting with country of origin.
368
Adopted person feels better able to make informed choices regarding developing and maintaining connections with birth family members or reconnecting with country of origin.
369
Adopted person learns more about options for openness/ongoing contact/information sharing as a result of searching for birth family members or reconnecting with country of origin.
370
Adopted person understands the types of documents that can be helpful in locating birth relatives.
371
Adopted person knows how/where to locate support groups for adopted people searching for birth relatives or those wishing to reconnect with country of origin.
372
Adopted person learns ways to cope with the possibility that birth parents or relatives may not be found.
373
Adopted person understands the type of assistance/information that the agency or attorney involved with his/her adoption may be able to provide.
374
Adopted person knows about reunion registries and confidential intermediaries.
375
Adopted person knows about laws regulating access to adoption records.
376
Adopted person knows how and where to locate adoption-competent counselors/therapists.
377
Adopted person knows where to locate books, websites, and other materials about the emotional aspects of searching.
378
Adopted person understands any State laws regulating meeting with a counselor or therapist before a reunion.
379
Adopted person knows how and where to locate support groups and services for birth relatives going through the search process.
380
Adopted person can identify some of the common reactions that birth parents/family members have to meeting/contacting adopted person (intensified feelings of grief and loss, renewed conflict about the decision to make an adoption plan, etc.).
381
Adopted person can identify some of the common reactions for adopted persons who meet/contact birth family members.
382
Adopted person can identify the services available to support him/her in dealing with reactions to meeting/contact with birth family members.
383
Adopted person can identify some of the common reactions that adoptive parents/family members have to the adopted person meeting/contacting birth family members.
384
Adopted person understands the importance of setting and maintaining boundaries with adoptive and birth family members.
385
Adopted person knows about the factors that may increase the possibility of a successful longer term relationship.
386
Adopted person understands that birth family members may have a different level of comfort with contact than the adopted person does.
387
Adopted person can talk about different options for contact with birth family members (information only, letters and photos, email, phone calls, visits, etc.).
388
Adopted person understands that comfort with contact may change over time for all triad members.
389
Adopted person can talk about healthy relationship building and maintenance techniques with family members.
390
Adopted person can identify family relationships that he/she would like to strengthen.
391
Adopted person can talk about the characteristics of healthy family relationships.
392
Adopted person feels supported by adoptive family in making decisions regarding search and reunion with birth family members or reconnecting with country of origin.
393
Adopted person talks with adoptive family members regarding search and/or reunion with birth family members or reconnecting with country of origin.
394
Adopted person can talk about expectations regarding search and/or reunion with birth family members or reconnecting with country of origin.
395
Adopted person can talk about the benefits and challenges of pursuing search/reunion at this particular stage of life.
396
Adopted person joins support groups for adopted people searching for birth relatives or those wishing to reconnect with their country of origin.
397
Adopted person uses reunion registries and confidential intermediaries (if available).
398
Adopted person uses online resources to aid in searching.
399
Adopted person seeks out other types of documents that can be helpful in locating birth relatives.
400
Adopted person feels appropriately supported throughout the search and information gathering process.
401
Adopted person contacts the agency (or attorney) involved with his/her adoption for assistance.
402
Adopted person reads/locates books, websites, and other materials about the emotional aspects of searching.
403
Adopted person joins support groups and accesses local services for adopted persons going through the search process.
404
Adopted person fulfills any State requirements to meet with a counselor or therapist before a reunion.
405
Adopted person meets with adoption-competent counselors/therapists if needed.
406
Adopted person accesses services and supports as needed after visits/contacts.
407
Adopted person feels supported by adoptive family members throughout the search and reunion process.
408
Adopted person sets and maintains boundaries with adoptive and birth family members that are comfortable for him/her.
409
Adopted person can accept the possibility that contact with birth family members may change over time.
410
Adopted person develops a plan for contact that is comfortable for him/her.
411
Adopted person can accept the level of contact and information about birth family members made available through the search process.
412
Adopted person feels respected and valued in his/her relationships with family members.
413
Adopted person uses strategies for maintaining healthy relationships.
414
Adopted person knows about activities (recreational activities, support groups, email listservs, online communities, etc.) for connecting with other adopted persons/the broader adoption community.
415
Adopted person can identify specific activities that will connect him/her with other adopted persons or the broader adoption community that fit with his/her schedule/lifestyle.
416
Adopted person can identify specific ways in which connecting with other adopted persons/the broader adoption community can be beneficial to him/her.
417
Adopted person receives specific benefits from connecting with other adopted persons.
418
Adopted person accesses activities that connect him/her with other adopted persons or the broader adoption community and fit with his/her schedules and lifestyle.
419
Adopted person feels an increased sense of community and decreased isolation from interacting with other members of the adoption community.
420
Adoptive and birth parents learn strategies to build and nurture a healthy relationship over time.
421
Adoptive parents and birth parents learn healthy, effective conflict resolution skills.
422
Adoptive parents and birth parents learn about the level of commitment necessary to invest in and nurture lifelong relationships.
423
Adoptive parents and birth parents know where to locate support and resources to support them in developing and nurturing a healthy relationship.
424
Adoptive parents and birth parents learn about the experience of other families in open adoption relationships.
425
All parties understand the impact that stopping contact may have on the adopted child and birth parents.
426
Birth parents understand that common reactions to visits can include intensified feelings of grief and loss, renewed conflict about the decision to make an adoption plan, etc.
427
Birth parents understand the grieving process and strategies to help them cope with feelings of grief.
428
Birth parents understand the services available to support them in dealing with feelings of grief, loss, and other emotions related to adoption.
429
Adoptive parents understand the benefits of openness for adopted children.
430
Adoptive parents understand openness in adoption.
431
Adoptive parents understand benefits of openness for adoptive family.
432
Adoptive parents understand benefits of openness for birth family.
433
Adoptive parents understand the laws regarding openness and access to adoption records.
434
Adoptive parents understand the challenges associated with openness in adoption.
435
Adoptive parents understand the importance of continuing agreed upon contact and the impact of discontinuing contact on child and birth parents/family.
436
Adoptive parents understand the ways to manage contact at different points throughout child's development.
437
Adoptive parents learn about the importance of continuing to send letters/photos/updates, even if contact from birth parent stops.
438
Adoptive parents learn strategies to resolve conflicts that might arise with their child's birth family.
439
Adoptive parents learn about the importance of discussing their ideas of what contact will mean/involve with their child's birth parents.
440
Birth parents understand the laws regarding openness and access to adoption records.
441
Birth parents understand the possibility that the agreement around frequency of contact may need to be renegotiated as the needs of all involved change.
442
Birth parents understand openness in adoption.
443
Birth parents understand challenges associated with openness in adoption.
444
Birth parents understand benefits of openness for all triad members.
445
Birth parents learn about establishing and maintaining appropriate boundaries.
446
Birth parents can talk about their expectations about what contact with their child and their child's adoptive family will involve.
447
Birth parents/family understand the importance of continuing agreed upon contact and the impact of discontinuing contact on the child and adoptive family.
448
Birth parents understand ways to manage contact at different points throughout child's development.
449
Birth parents learn strategies to resolve conflicts that arise with their child's adoptive family.
450
Birth parents learn about the importance of discussing their ideas of what contact will mean/involve with their child's adoptive parents.
451
Birth parents understand laws regarding openness and access to adoption records.
452
Birth parents learn about the importance of continuing to send letters/photos/updates, even if contact from adoptive parents stops.
453
Adoptive parents learn about lifebooks and how to create one for their child.
454
Adoptive parents understand the importance of helping their child maintain a connection with his/her past.
455
Adoptive family learns developmentally appropriate ways to discuss the child's adoption and unique history with him/her.
456
Adoptive parents collect photos and other meaningful mementos from their child's birthplace, culture, etc. to share with the child at developmentally appropriate stages.
457
Adoptive parents know about the connection between developing a healthy identity and knowledge of birth family history/circumstances of the adoption, etc.
458
Adoptive parents feel comfortable answering any questions related to adoption that their child may ask.
459
Adopted person understands laws regarding openness and access to adoption records.
460
Adopted person learns about the importance of discussing his/her ideas of what contact will mean/involve with birth parents and family.
461
Adopted person understands the benefits and challenges associated with openness in adoption.
462
Adopted person understands openness in adoption.
463
Adoptive family and adopted child/youth report that contacts with birth parents/family are generally respectful and positive.
464
Birth parents feel respected by adoptive family.
465
Adopted child/youth develops a fuller sense of identity from direct knowledge of birth family members, genetic history, etc.
466
Adopted child/youth feels supported by adoptive parents and birth parents/family.
467
Triad members access resources and supports to help them nurture their relationship.
468
Triad members renegotiate contact over time as needed, according to the child's developmental needs.
469
Birth parents report feeling they can cope better with visits and the emotions they experience after visits.
470
Birth parents use strategies for coping with grief and loss associated with their child's adoption.
471
Birth parents access the services and supports available to them as necessary after visits.
472
Adoptive parents send photos and letters according to the agreed upon frequency.
473
Adoptive parents keep scheduled visits with birth parents.
474
Adoptive parents regularly tell their child about his/her adoption story.
475
Adoptive parents have examples of how they respond to their child's questions about his/her adoption.
476
Adoptive parents talk about their child's birth parents/family in a positive, respectful manner.
477
Adoptive parents work through conflict with their child's birth parents.
478
Adoptive parents nurture and maintain a healthy relationship with their child's birth parents/family.
479
Adoptive parents report greater empathy towards birth parents.
480
Birth parents report lower levels of grief.
481
Adoptive parents work with a mediator or counselor to resolve conflicts that arise with birth family members.
482
Adoptive parents report greater comfort with contact with birth relatives.
483
Adoptive parents discuss differing ideas about what contact means with their child's birth parents and renegotiate this as their relationship develops.
484
Adoptive parents maintain a level of contact agreed upon by all parties.
485
Adoptive parents support and nurture the adopted person's connection with birth family.
486
Adoptive parents report strengthened connections with other members of the triad.
487
Adoptive parents have examples of how they have worked with their child's birth parents to renegotiate contact over time as appropriate for their family.
488
Birth parents discuss their expectations about what contact with their child and their child's adoptive family will involve with the adoptive family and agency involved in the adoption (if applicable).
489
Birth parents discuss the adoptive parents' expectations about what contact between the birth parents and adoptive family will involve with the adoptive family and agency involved in the adoption (if applicable).
490
Birth parents negotiate a level of openness that feels comfortable for them.
491
Birth parents renegotiate contact with adopted person/family as appropriate or needed over time.
492
Birth parents maintain a level of contact agreed upon by all parties.
493
Birth parents report strengthened connections with other members of triad.
494
Birth parents work with a mediator or counselor to resolve conflicts that arise with the adoptive family.
495
Birth parents continue to send letters/photos/updates to the adoptive family (or through the agency), even if agreed upon contact stops.
496
Birth parents report lower levels of grief.
497
Birth parents discuss differing ideas about what contact means with their child's adoptive parents and discuss and renegotiate this as their relationship develops.
498
Adoptive parents share with their child the information they have about their child's birth family, circumstances surrounding the adoption, medical history, etc., as developmentally appropriate.
499
Adoptive parents share photos and other meaningful mementos from their child's birthplace/culture with the child as developmentally appropriate.
500
Adopted person feels that his/her questions regarding the adoption and/or past history are answered.
501
Adoptive parents answer their child's questions related to adoption.
502
Adoptive parents create a lifebook with their child.
503
Adopted person has examples of what contact means to him/her and his/her adopted parents and birth parents and discusses and renegotiates this as their relationship develops over time.
504
Adopted person reports strengthened connections with other members of the triad.
505
Adopted person works with a mediator or counselor to resolve possible conflicts that arise with the birth or adoptive family when other efforts to resolve conflict are not successful.
506
Adopted person renegotiates contact with birth parents and family as appropriate or needed over time.
507
Contact is renegotiated as is fitting for the adopted person and adoptive and birth families over time.
508
Parties continue contact according to their agreements over time.
509
Parties seek to resolve conflicts through mediation when other efforts have not been successful.
510
Parties are satisfied with level of contact.
511
Birth parents know about reunion registries and confidential intermediaries.
512
Birth parents know about laws regulating access to adoption records.
513
Birth relatives understand the types of documents that can be helpful in locating a birth child.
514
Birth parents know how and where to locate support groups for birth relatives going through the search process.
515
Birth parents know how and where to locate support groups and services for birth relatives going through the search process.
516
Birth parents know where to locate books, websites, and other materials about the emotional aspects of searching.
517
Birth parents understand any State laws regulating meeting with a counselor or therapist before a reunion.
518
Birth parents know how and where to locate adoption-competent counselors/therapists.
519
Adoptive parents initiate discussions with the adopted person and share information that may aid the search process.
520
Adoptive parents understand the potential benefits for their child of searching for the child's birth family.
521
Adoptive parents learn strategies to deal with their own feelings and fears about the search process.
522
Adoptive parents understand the impact of adoption on identity development of adopted people.
523
Birth parents understand the emotional impact reunion may have on the adopted person.
524
Birth parents understand factors that may increase the possibility of a successful longer term relationship.
525
Birth parents know how and where to locate adoption competent therapists.
526
Birth parents know how and where to locate support groups and services for reuniting birth relatives.
527
Adopted person understands the emotional impact reunion may have on the birth parent.
528
Adopted person knows where to locate books, websites, and other materials about the emotional aspects of reunion.
529
Adopted person understands the factors that may increase the possibility of a successful longer term relationship.
530
Adopted person knows how/where to locate adoption-competent counselors/therapists.
531
Adopted person knows how/where to locate support groups and services for reuniting with birth relatives.
532
Birth parents join support groups for birth parents searching for adopted children.
533
Birth parents use reunion registries and confidential intermediaries (if available).
534
Birth parents use online resources to aid in searching.
535
Birth parents seek out other types of documents that can be helpful in locating adopted children.
536
Birth parents join support groups and access local services for birth relatives going through the search process.
537
Birth parents read/locate books, websites, and other materials about the emotional aspects of searching.
538
Birth parents fulfill any State requirements to meet with a counselor or therapist before a reunion.
539
Birth parents meet with adoption-competent counselors/therapists if needed.
540
Adoptive parents make child-centered decisions regarding search and information gathering.
541
Adopted person feels supported in decision-making regarding search and information gathering.
542
Adoptive parents support adopted person's decision regarding search and reunion.
543
Birth parents make child-centered decisions regarding search and information gathering.
544
Adoptive parents understand the benefits of contact with the birth family (if desired) on adopted people.
545
Birth parent fulfills any State requirements to meet with a counselor or therapist before a reunion.
546
Birth parents join support groups and access other support services to aid in processing the reunion experience.
547
Adopted person joins support groups and accesses other support services to aid in processing the reunion experience.
548
Adopted person fulfills any State requirements to meet with a counselor or therapist before a reunion.
549
Adoptive families know about respite care services in their area.
550
Adoptive families are aware of schools with teachers trained in adoption issues.
551
Adoptive families know where to access adoption-competent mental/behavioral/emotional/dental health providers in their area.
552
Adopted youth/adults understand the issues involved with search and reunion.
553
Adopted youth/adults know about State reunion registries.
554
Adopted youth/adults know where to access adoption-competent mental/behavioral/emotional health providers in their area.
555
Birth families report knowing about State reunion registries.
556
Birth families understand the issues involved with search and reunion.
557
Birth families report knowing about search support groups in their area.
558
Birth families know where to access adoption-competent mental/behavioral/emotional health providers in their area.
559
Community leaders are aware of benefits of respite services.
560
Community leaders commit increased resources to respite services available to adoptive families.
561
Community leaders have an increased awareness of the need for State reunion registries.
562
Community leaders have an increased acceptance of search and reunion as a normal and healthy part of development and identity formation.
563
Community leaders have an increased understanding of the dynamics of search and reunion.
564
Community leaders have an understanding of the importance of adoption records to adopted people.
565
Mental/behavioral/emotional health providers learn about the lifelong implications of forming a family through adoption.
566
Mental/behavioral/emotional health providers learn adoption-sensitive language.
567
Mental/behavioral/emotional health providers learn about the lifelong implications of being a birth parent who made an adoption plan for his/her child.
568
Mental/behavioral/emotional health providers learn about adoption-competent strategies for assessment.
569
Mental/behavioral/emotional health providers learn about appropriate interventions for all members of the adoption triad.
570
School personnel learn about the lifelong implications of forming a family through adoption.
571
School personnel understand the impact adoption and related issues can have on an adopted student's school performance/adjustment.
572
School personnel learn positive adoption language.
573
Teachers learn strategies for using adoption-sensitive assignments.
574
Teachers understand the developmental stages at which adoption issues often arise.
575
Adoptive families use other support services in their area.
576
Adoptive families report that their children's teachers have an awareness of adoption issues and use positive adoption language in the classroom.
577
Adoptive families use respite care services in their area.
578
Adopted youth/adults access the State reunion registries and/or allowable adoption records.
579
Adopted youth/adults accept search and reunion as a normal and healthy part of their development.
580
Adopted youth/adults access adoption-competent mental/behavioral/emotional health providers in their area when they need them.
581
Birth families access search support groups in their area.
582
Birth families access State reunion registries.
583
Birth parents accept grief/loss and/or search and reunion as a normal and healthy part of their experience as birth parents.
584
Birth families access adoption-competent mental/behavioral/emotional health providers in their area when they need them.
585
There is a documented increase in usage of qualified, trained respite care providers by adoptive families in a given community.
586
There is a documented increase in the number of respite care providers recruited and trained in a given community.
587
There is a documented increase in usage of support services in a given community by all triad members.
588
Additional community resources are developed to support triad members in search and reunion efforts.
589
There is a documented increase in the utilization of State reunion registries.
590
There is a documented increase in access to adoption records by adopted youth/adults.
591
Mental/behavioral/emotional health providers seek complete credentialing programs in adoption.
592
Mental/behavioral/emotional health providers use adoption-sensitive language in their work with all triad members or are able to give examples of when they used adoption-sensitive language.
593
Mental/behavioral/emotional health providers conduct client assessments in an adoption-competent manner.
594
Mental/behavioral/emotional health providers use adoption-competent interventions and strategies with all triad members.
595
There is a documented increase in the number of adopted children who receive educational screening as needed.
596
School personnel use positive adoption language in the school setting.
597
Educational records indicate that adopted children are placed in educational programs that best address their needs and enable them to attain their full academic potential.
598
Reviews of school and case records indicate that school personnel, families, and community agencies work collaboratively with families and community agencies as needed to provide appropriate services and supports to adoptive families.
599
Adoptive parents/families are aware of foster/adoptive parent groups in their area.
600
Adopted parents/families are aware of a therapist competent in adoption issues they can call if needed.
601
Adoptive parents/families are aware of experienced mentor adoptive families they can call if needed.
602
Adopted youth/adults are aware of a mentoring program in their area.
603
Adopted youth/adults are aware of support groups for adopted people in their community.
604
Adopted youth/adults are aware of a therapist competent in adoption issues they can call if needed.
605
Birth parents are aware of at least one other birth parent they could call if needed to discussion adoption issues.
606
Birth parents/families are aware of birth parent support groups in their area.
607
Adoptive parents understand the additional layers of identity formation for children who are adopted.
608
Adoptive parents understand the importance of providing their adopted children with a strong sense of their own identity.
609
Adoptive parents understand the importance of helping their children develop a healthy racial or cultural identity if they are parenting children from a different race and/or ethnic or cultural background.
610
Adoptive parents understand the unique challenges their specific children may have in their own identity formation (e.g., physical differences, medical issues, age, developmental level, age at adoption, past trauma, cognitive development, degree of contact with birth family members, etc.).
611
Adoptive parents understand parenting techniques that encourage positive, secure attachment (e.g., consistency, predictability, loving eye contact, increased appropriate physical contact, loving nurturing, increased time together, demonstrated empathy, etc.).
612
Adoptive parents can name signs of a secure attachment.
613
Adoptive parents understand the importance of their child having a secure attachment with them.
614
Adoptive parents understand signs that their child may have attachment difficulties (e.g., lack of eye contact, indiscriminate affection, lack of empathy for others, etc.).
615
Adoptive parents know the words to use in talking about adoption and any potential difficult history.
616
Adoptive parents understand what children are capable of comprehending at each developmental level.
617
Adoptive parents understand the importance of using positive, respectful, adoption language in talking with their child about adoption.
618
Adoptive parents have a clear (as possible) understanding of a child's unique history prior to joining their family.
619
Adoptive parents understand the importance of using positive, respectful, adoption language in talking about adoption.
620
Adoptive parents understand the importance of respecting their child's boundaries and personal information.
621
Adoptive parents can talk about what information they wish to share with others and what should remain private (or up to their child to share), with extended family members, friends, teachers, strangers, etc.
622
Adoptive parents know where to access resources to help them explain adoption to family members, teachers, and other children.
623
Adoptive parents learn how to respond to comments they may encounter as a result of their status as an adoptive family.
624
Adoptive parents have examples of ways they received positive support from their family and friends in relation to the adoption.
625
Adoptive parents demonstrate a commitment to the children.
626
Adoptive parents have examples of situations in which their flexibility, tolerance, patience, unconditional love for the child, and sense of humor was evident in their parenting.
627
Adoptive parents feel fully committed to their children.
628
Adoptive parents demonstrate (in words and actions) a clear sense of entitlement to parent particular children (e.g., they clearly act as if they have the right to parent these children).
629
Adoptive parents create new family rituals and traditions together with their adopted children.
630
Adoptive parents participate in routine family activities that demonstrate they embrace the children as part of the family.
631
Adoptive parents provide regular opportunities for the child to interact with people who are members of the child's race or culture.
632
Adoptive parents speak in a child's native language or have literature in the home in that language (if different from their own).
633
Adoptive parents provide regular opportunities for the child to interact with same- and opposite-sex role models.
634
Adoptive parents can help prepare their children to respond to questions or comments they may encounter as a result of the child's differences from the family.
635
Adoptive parents provide consistent role models for their children to assist in identity development.
636
Adoptive parents provide regular opportunities for their children to meet and interact with others who share their unique attributes (race, culture, disability, adoptive status, etc.) to encourage positive identity formation.
637
Adoptive parents talk about their children's attributes (specifically acknowledging those given by their birth family) in positive ways so as to encourage the children's positive identity development.
638
Adoptive parents provide books and toys depicting diversity.
639
Adoptive parents discuss their children's difficult past history in a sensitive, age-appropriate manner, using positive adoption language.
640
Adoptive parents create a lifebook with their child to help him/her understand his/her past.
641
Adoptive parents create and maintain a lifebook with their child to help the child understand how he/she came to be a part of their family.
642
Child's attachment to adoptive parents is strengthened.
643
Adoptive parents regularly use parenting techniques that encourage positive, secure attachment (e.g., consistency, predictability, loving eye contact, increased appropriate physical contact, loving nurturing, increased time together, demonstrated empathy, etc.).
644
Adoptive parents access services and supports to help their child with attachment issues as needed.
645
Adoptive parents demonstrate attunement to their child's needs in their daily parenting activities.
646
Adoptive parents discuss their child's difficult past history in a sensitive manner, using positive adoption language that their child can understand.
647
Adoptive parents repeatedly explain their child's adoption story to their child in positive, developmentally appropriate ways.
648
Adoptive parents respond to their child's questions about adoption openly and honestly, using positive adoption language.
649
Adoptive parents talk about their child's birth family members (or others to whom their child was attached) in honest, yet positive ways, using positive, respectful adoption language.
650
Adoptive parents use their child's lifebook as a way to talk about their child's past.
651
Adoptive parents use positive, respectful language in talking about adoption.
652
Adoptive parents can respond to questions or comments they may encounter as a result of their status as an adoptive family.
653
Adoptive parents respect their child's boundaries and personal information when discussing adoption with others.
654
Adoptive parents use available resources to help them explain adoption to family members, teachers, and other children.
655
Local professionals and community leaders have an increased awareness of the need for support services for triad members.
656
Local professionals and community leaders identify gaps in support services to adoption triad members in their community.
657
Adoptive parents/families attend or communicate with a support group.
658
Adoptive parents/families can name at least one experienced family they have called in times of crisis or need.
659
Adoptive parents/families feel supported by their foster/adoptive parent support group.
660
Adoptive parents/families use therapists skilled in adoption issues.
661
Adopted youth/adults know at least one other adopted youth/adult they can talk to about adoption-related issues.
662
Adopted youth/adults feel supported by a group of other adopted children/youth.
663
Adopted youth/adults attend or communicate with a support group of other adopted people.
664
Adoptive youth/adults use therapists skilled in adoption issues.
665
Birth parents/families attend or communicate with a birth parent support group.
666
Birth parents/families feel supported by a birth parent support group.
667
Birth parents/families name at least one family they have contacted to talk about adoption-related issues.
668
Birth parents/families use therapists skilled in adoption issues.
669
Survey responses indicate that communities have sufficient resources to meet the needs of triad members.
670
Survey responses indicate triad members have access to adoption-competent service providers.
671
Survey responses indicate triad members have access to support groups and other services in the community when they need them.
672
Triad members and/or professionals understand how laws are made and policies enacted.
673
Triad members and/or professionals are aware of organizations or groups that may be advocating for their service needs.
674
Triad members and/or professionals know who their local, State, and Federal representatives are and how to contact them.
675
Triad members and/or professionals are aware of potential service providers for triad members' unmet service needs.
676
Caseworkers approach funding sources to advocate for funds to meet clients' unmet service needs.
677
Caseworkers advocate for changes in law or policy that would benefit clients and assist in meeting their service needs if allowed in their setting.
678
Caseworkers approach potential service providers to advocate for the provision of services needed by their clients.
679
Triad members and/or professionals effectively lobby their representatives in local, State, and/or Federal Government to encourage the passage of laws and policies that would benefit triad members.
680
Triad members and/or professionals approach potential service providers to advocate for services to meet triad members' unmet service needs.
681
Triad members and/or professionals join or form organizations to advocate for causes that further the rights of triad members and/or services available to them.
682
Triad members and/or professionals effectively help to shape laws or policies that affect services to triad members by sharing concrete information about the service needs and gaps in their jurisdictions.
683
Adoptive parents are aware of other funds that might be available to meet their service needs.
684
Adoptive parents are aware of adoption assistance for which their child is eligible.
685
Adoptive parents/families are aware of the availability of college scholarships or tuition waivers for adopted children/youth who were adopted from foster care.
686
Adopted youth/adults adopted from foster care are aware of scholarships or tuition waivers for youth who were adopted from foster care.
687
Adopted youth/adults are aware of funds to meet other service needs.
688
Birth parents/families are aware of funds to meet their medical expenses for the baby.
689
Birth parents are aware of financial benefits for which they are eligible.
690
Surveys note a documented increase in awareness of employer adoption benefit.
691
Surveys note a documented increase in awareness of adoption tax credits.
692
Surveys note a documented increase in awareness of educational voucher and scholarships for youth adopted from foster care.
693
Surveys note a documented increase in awareness of adoption assistance and other financial benefits.
694
Increased education and outreach regarding general financial supports are available to youth to support higher education.
695
Increased education and outreach regarding adoption-specific financial supports are available to youth to support higher education.
696
Increased education and outreach regarding student loan options are available to youth to support higher education.
697
Adoptive parents/families access adoption assistance for which they are eligible.
698
Adoptive parents/families access scholarships or tuition waivers for eligible children who were adopted.
699
Adoptive parents/families access other available funds to meet their service needs.
700
Adopted youth/adults access funds to meet other service needs.
701
Adopted youth/adults access scholarships or tuition waivers for which they are eligible.
702
Birth parents access other financial benefits for which they are eligible.
703
Birth parents/families access financial assistance to help meet medical expenses for which they are eligible.
704
There is a documented increase in the number and percentage of eligible triad members accessing educational vouchers and scholarships.
705
There is a documented increase in the number and percentage of eligible families receiving employer adoption benefits.
706
New funds are available to provide financial assistance to adoption triad members.
707
There is a documented increase in the number of triad members who are eligible for financial benefits.
708
There is a documented increase in the number and percentage of eligible adoptive families receiving adoption tax credits.
709
There is a documented increase in the number and percentage of eligible adoptive families receiving adoption assistance benefits.
710
There is increased support to families in applying for financial assistance to support higher education.
711
Increased numbers of families receive information on funding options to support higher education.
712
An increased number of adopted persons consider/pursue higher education.
713
Adoptive parents are aware of unmet needs of the children they are parenting.
714
Adoptive parents can identify at least one need their adopted child has that they have not been able to meet because they did not have the resources (although the service was available in their community).
715
Adoptive parents can identify at least one need their adopted child has that they have not been able to meet because no services were available in their community.
716
The number of families who attend informational meetings about older children who wait increases.
717
The number of families who respond to media campaigns regarding older children who wait increases.
718
The number of families who respond to surveys noting they are aware of older children who wait increases.
719
Adoptive parents can name reasons why having a consistent positive parenting team is important.
720
Adoptive parents are aware of resources to support their marriage/partnership.
721
Adoptive parents know how this transition to parenting can affect a marriage/partnership.
722
Adoptive parents have access to resources to support their marriage/partnership (reading material, family, friends, faith community, etc.).
723
Adoptive parents learn negotiation skills.
724
Adoptive parents learn positive, effective conflict resolution skills.
725
Adoptive parents learn strategies for improving communication.
726
Adoptive parents understand how inconsistent parenting can impact children.
727
Adoptive parents can talk about potential areas of conflict about parenting decisions.
728
Adoptive parents understand the importance of maintaining a unified approach to parenting.
729
Adoptive parents can talk about their values and the values they wish to instill in their children.
730
Adoptive parents understand strategies to present a unified front (working out differences in parenting approach/values in private, agreeing to compromise, supporting other parent's decisions).
731
Adoptive parents use resources to support their marriage/partnership (reading material, family, friends, faith community, etc.).
732
Couples use support systems appropriately on a regular basis to strengthen their marriage/partnership.
733
Couples regularly take time to strengthen their relationship by spending time alone together without the child(ren).
734
Adoptive parents provide a united front in parenting their adopted child(ren).
735
Adoptive parents use positive, effective conflict resolution skills.
736
Adoptive parents use strategies for improving communication.
737
Adoptive parents successfully use negotiation skills.
738
Adoptive parents are consistent in their approach to discipline.
739
Adoptive parents use strategies to present a unified front (working out differences in parenting approach/values in private, agreeing to compromise, supporting other parent's decisions).
740
Adoptive parents are accepting of differences in each other's parenting styles.
741
Adoptive parents successfully resolve conflict about parenting decisions.
742
Adoptive parents know about activities (support groups, email listservs, etc.) that can connect them with other adoptive parents.
743
Adoptive parents can identify specific activities that will connect them with other adoptive families that fit within their schedules and lifestyle.
744
Adoptive parents can identify specific ways in which connecting with other adoptive parents can be helpful to them.
745
Adoptive parents can identify specific ways in which connecting with other adoptive families can be helpful to their adopted children.
746
Adoptive parents can identify other sources of support available in their community (i.e., faith community, support groups, etc.).
747
Adoptive parents/family can identify existing supportive relationships.
748
Adoptive parents learn techniques for strengthening relationships.
749
Adoptive parents learn about the importance of developing high quality relationships among family members.
750
Adoptive parents access activities that connect them with other adoptive parents and fit with their schedules and lifestyles.
751
Adoptive parents feel a decreased sense of isolation/increased sense of support.
752
Adoptive parents receive specific benefits from connecting with other adoptive parents.
753
Adopted children feel less isolation/greater sense of belonging from exposure to other families like their own.
754
Adoptive parents use techniques to strengthen their relationships/maintain high quality relationships.
755
Adoptive parents access other sources of support in their community (i.e., faith community, support groups, etc.).
756
Adoptive parents report strengthened relationships with other family members.
757
Adoptive parents report feeling supported by their family and community.
758
Adoptive parents understand effective coping skills.
759
Adoptive parents understand the use of humor as a stress/coping mechanism.
760
Adoptive parents understand effective techniques for stress management.
761
Adoptive parents report knowing how to identify when help is needed.
762
Adoptive parents understand effective techniques for anger management.
763
Adoptive parents use humor as a stress/coping mechanism.
764
Adoptive parents report a reduction in the use of ineffective coping/stress management skills.
765
Adoptive parents report asking for/using help when needed.
766
Adoptive parents use effective coping/stress management skills when facing difficult situations.
767
Adoptive parents can give examples of how they managed stressful/difficult situations.
768
Adoptive parents can talk about the issues of grief associated with adoption.
769
Adoptive parents understand how adopted children experience grief and loss as a result of the adoptive placement.
770
Adoptive parents understand the impact of adoption on birth parents.
771
Adoptive parents can talk about the issues of loss associated with adoption.
772
Adoptive parents understand secondary loss.
773
Adoptive parents understand the stages of grief.
774
Adoptive parents understand strategies to help children cope with grief at different ages/developmental stages.
775
Adoptive parents understand how adopted children experience grief and loss as a result of the adoptive placement at different ages/developmental stages.
776
Adoptive parents know where to locate services and supports to help their child to work through grief and loss.
777
Adoptive parents understand strategies to help children work through feelings of loss at different ages/developmental stages.
778
Adoptive parents understand the connection between openness in adoption and lower levels of grief and loss.
779
Adoptive parents can talk about their emotions and feelings of loss related to infertility.
780
Adoptive parents understand strategies to help them work through feelings of loss due to infertility.
781
Adoptive parents understand how certain life events (Mother's Day, birth in the family, close friend's pregnancy, etc.) can trigger feelings of grief/loss over infertility.
782
Adoptive parents understand the impact of adoption on birth parents/family members.
783
Adoptive parents understand the impact of adoption on adopted children and adults.
784
Parents understand the importance of their child's birth family and culture and maintaining positive connections with the child's past.
785
Adoptive parents understand issues of loss associated with choosing to place a child for adoption or having the choice made by others.
786
Adoptive parents access support groups and adoption-competent therapists to work through grief associated with feelings of loss as needed and appropriate.
787
Adoptive parents use appropriate strategies to address their own feelings of loss associated with adoption when needed.
788
Adoptive parents report improved emotional well-being.
789
Adoptive parents report an overall lower sense of grief and loss.
790
Adoptive parents acknowledge their child's feelings of loss with their child, as age/developmentally appropriate.
791
Adoptive parents use strategies to help children cope with grief at different ages/developmental stages.
792
Adoptive parents can give examples that indicate their child has overall diminished grief and loss.
793
Adoptive parents access services and supports to help their child to work through grief and loss as needed.
794
Adoptive parents can give examples that indicate their child has improved emotional well-being and an overall sense of self-worth/esteem.

 
 
Friends Logo The Logic Model Builder was a collaborative effort between the FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention (www.friendsnrc.org), who developed the content, and the National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information (nccanch.acf.hhs.gov), who created the database.