skip navigation
Logic Model builder for Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention/Family Support Programs
Home     Outcomes      Indicators     Tools
 
 
 

All Indicators for Prevention LMB

Serial #
Indicator
1
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the benefits of prenatal care for infants.
2
Participants demonstrate knowledge of what prenatal care entails.
3
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the benefits of prenatal care for mothers.
4
Participants have contact information for local medical care providers who provide prenatal care.
5
Participants demonstrate knowledge of where they can access prenatal care in their community.
6
Participants who are pregnant find health care providers for prenatal care.
7
Participants attend (insert number) visits/appointments during pregnancy.
8
Participants demonstrate knowledge of prenatal lifestyle habits that increase the likelihood of a healthy baby.
9
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the effects of stress and/or violence on a fetus.
10
Participants demonstrate knowledge of prenatal lifestyle habits that decrease the likelihood of a healthy baby.
11
Participants maintain a healthy diet.
12
Participants who are pregnant refrain from using drugs, including alcohol, during pregnancy.
13
Participants live in violence-free environments.
14
Participants who are pregnant have an appropriate exercise routine.
15
Babies are born free of substance exposure.
16
Participants practice effective and healthy strategies to reduce stress in their lives.
17
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the importance of breast-feeding.
18
Participants demonstrate knowledge of what are appropriate sleeping arrangements for an infant.
19
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the importance of immunizations.
20
Participants demonstrate knowledge of appropriate formulas for their babies.
21
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the types and quantities of clothing, bedding, and diapering supplies needed for infants and where to access them at a low cost.
22
Participants demonstrate knowledge of nutritional and medical programs that can provide free or low-cost services for themselves or their babies (WIC, Health Department, etc.).
23
Participants demonstrate knowledge of their personal needs for rest and self-care and how they are related to providing quality care to their infants.
24
Participants have appropriate sleeping arrangements for their infants.
25
Participants schedule immunizations for their infants.
26
Participants breast-feed or feed their infants an appropriate formula.
27
Participants have clothing, bedding, and diapering supplies needed for their infants.
28
Participants access nutritional and medical programs that can provide free or low-cost services for themselves or their babies (WIC, Health Department, etc.) as needed.
29
Participants arrange for friends and/or family members to provide occasional respite so that the participants can take care of their personal needs for rest and other self-care.
30
Participants demonstrate knowledge of postnatal depression symptoms.
31
Participants demonstrate knowledge of where they can get help (mental health care, support group, etc.) if they develop symptoms of postnatal depression.
32
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the effects postnatal depression can have on the entire family.
33
Participants with symptoms of postnatal depression receive appropriate treatment.
34
Participants with symptoms of postnatal depression identify them.
35
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how and when to introduce new foods to their children.
36
Participants demonstrate knowledge of foods and portions that are appropriate to their children's health, needs, ages, and development.
37
Participants demonstrate knowledge of healthy snacks for themselves and their children.
38
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to read food labels.
39
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the dangers of obesity.
40
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to access WIC, food stamps, food banks, and other nutrition programs.
41
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how diet and exercise are related to health.
42
Participants engage in games and activities that provide appropriate exercise for themselves and their families.
43
Participants introduce new foods to their children according to the children's ages and needs.
44
Participants serve foods and portions that are appropriate to their children's health, needs, ages, and development.
45
Participants make healthy snacks available for themselves and their children.
46
Participants read food labels prior to making food purchases.
47
Participants and their families routinely engage in games, play, and other activities that provide appropriate exercise.
48
Participants access WIC, food stamps, food banks, and other nutrition programs as needed.
49
Participants demonstrate knowledge of healthy standards of hygiene for their infants or children that includes bathing and diapering.
50
Participants demonstrate knowledge of nutritional programs that are appropriate for their infants or children.
51
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how and where to secure a "medical home" for their infants or children.
52
Participants demonstrate knowledge of when to schedule routine medical examinations (including well-baby visits) and immunizations.
53
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to select appropriate caregivers for their children.
54
Participants demonstrate knowledge of when it is appropriate to seek medical care for their children.
55
Participants demonstrate knowledge of nonviolent methods of discipline.
56
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the necessity of using appropriate restraints for children riding in automobiles.
57
Participants obtain routine medical examinations (including well-baby visits) and immunizations.
58
Participants maintain a healthy standard of hygiene for their infants and children.
59
Participants received appropriate medical care for their children as needed.
60
Participants have secured a "medical home" for their infants or children.
61
Participants access and use appropriate child restraints whenever their children are in automobiles.
62
Participants have selected appropriate caregivers for their infants or children.
63
Participants do not spank, hit, slap, or yell at their children.
64
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how anxiety, exhaustion, depression, anger, and other stressors can affect their ability to parent.
65
Participants identify when they are experiencing anxiety, exhaustion, anger, depression, or other stressors that affect their mental health.
66
Participants demonstrate knowledge of where to go in the community for help when they are experiencing stress (respite programs, anger management classes, mental health counseling, parent support groups, etc.).
67
Participants demonstrate knowledge of healthy methods to reduce stress.
68
Participants identify reliable friends and family members to whom they can turn for help when they are experiencing stress.
69
Participants receive help and support from safe, appropriate, and reliable friends and family members when they are experiencing stress.
70
Participants use community resources (respite programs, anger management classes, mental health counseling, parent support groups, etc.) for help when they are experiencing stressors such as anxiety, anger, depression, and fear.
71
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how family lifestyle choices can reduce or increase stress and/or anger.
72
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to share their feelings and concerns in productive ways.
73
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the "hot buttons" that trigger their anger.
74
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to communicate with others without yelling or name-calling.
75
Participants describe healthy techniques for gaining control of their emotions.
76
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to effectively and assertively solve problems without aggression or violence.
77
Participants solve problems with others effectively and assertively.
78
Participants communicate with others without yelling or name-calling.
79
When participants recognize signs that indicate they are losing control of their emotions, they practice effective and healthy methods of relaxation.
80
Participants share their feelings and concerns in productive ways.
81
Participants use healthy coping methods to reduce stress and/or anger.
82
Participants assertively and nonviolently protect themselves and their family if they are threatened with violence.
83
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the materials and supplies needed to have a child-safe home and where to get them.
84
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the conditions that create a child-safe home.
85
Participants have a list of emergency numbers.
86
Participants demonstrate knowledge of common household hazards (including outside hazards) that jeopardize child safety.
87
Participants develop a plan to create a child-safe home.
88
Participants access and install materials and supplies needed to have a child-safe home.
89
Participants post or have ready access to a list of emergency numbers.
90
Participants remove household hazards (including outside hazards) that jeopardize child safety.
91
Participants maintain a home that is free of household hazards (including outside hazards) that jeopardize child safety.
92
Participants update their household safety modifications based on their children's developmental changes.
93
Participants update their list of emergency numbers as needed and use it when necessary.
94
Participants demonstrate knowledge of risk factors in their local community.
95
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to supervise their children according to the developmental needs of the child.
96
Participants demonstrate knowledge of measures they will take to keep their children safe from risk factors in their local community.
97
Participants access community resources for help when needed.
98
Participants construct safety plans for their children that reduce their exposure to risk factors in their local community.
99
Participants supervise their children according to the developmental needs of the children.
100
Participants ensure that their children are in a safe environment when in the care of others.
101
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the effects on the developing infant when a pregnant woman smokes or ingests drugs and alcohol.
102
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the effects of substance dependency and abuse on parenting, relationships with friends and family members, and their personal health.
103
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the signs of substance abuse/dependency in themselves and their family members.
104
Participants demonstrate knowledge of what codependence is and its relationship to substance abuse/dependency.
105
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to access resources in their communities for dealing with substance abuse/dependency problems.
106
Participants demonstrate knowledge of which resources are available in their communities for dealing with substance abuse/dependency problems.
107
Participants demonstrate knowledge of friends and family who can offer support for dealing with issues related to substance abuse/dependency.
108
Participants who are dependent on or who abuse substances enroll in an appropriate in-patient or out-patient treatment program.
109
Participants contact friends and family for support in dealing with issues related to substance abuse/dependency.
110
Family members, including children and youth, who are dependent on or who abuse substances enroll in an appropriate in-patient or out-patient treatment program.
111
Family members do not enable one another to resume substance abuse.
112
Family members support the efforts of one another to maintain a home free of substance abuse.
113
Participants and/or family members who have been dependent on or who have abused substances remain clean and sober.
114
Participants and/or family members who are dependent on or who abuse substances adhere to treatment plans.
115
Participants identify activities that they enjoy (reading, clubs, sports, hobbies, etc.).
116
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the need to regularly associate with other adults.
117
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to effectively advocate for themselves.
118
Participants identify their personal needs for health and safety.
119
Participants feel confident and competent when talking with teachers, doctors, and others.
120
Participants associate with other adults regularly.
121
Participants find time at least once per week for activities that they enjoy (reading, clubs, sports, hobbies, etc.).
122
Participants effectively advocate for themselves.
123
Participants meet their personal needs for health and safety.
124
Participants demonstrate knowledge of what constitutes physically violent behavior.
125
Participants demonstrate knowledge of typical cycles of abuse.
126
Participants demonstrate knowledge of what constitutes emotionally violent behavior.
127
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the laws related to domestic violence.
128
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the effects on the cognitive functioning of children who witness domestic violence.
129
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the emotional effects on children who witness domestic violence.
130
Participants demonstrate knowledge of public and private agencies that can provide help with domestic violence issues.
131
Participants identify reliable, safe, and appropriate friends and family members who can offer support in dealing with domestic violence issues.
132
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the services each agency provides as it relates to domestic violence.
133
Participants are not living with an untreated offender.
134
Participants have a safety plan in place.
135
Any member of the participants' households who has perpetrated domestic violence is receiving appropriate treatment.
136
Participants use nonviolent means of child discipline.
137
None of the participants' family members experiences or witnesses domestic violence.
138
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the negative consequences of physical punishments and coercion.
139
Participants demonstrate knowledge of effective and appropriate alternatives to corporal punishment.
140
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the legal definitions of child abuse and neglect.
141
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the importance of noticing and encouraging their children's positive behaviors.
142
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the importance of positive role modeling.
143
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the importance of spending time positively interacting with their children.
144
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the importance of consistency in setting and maintaining rules.
145
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the importance of predictable and developmentally appropriate routines for their children (bedtime, meals, homework, etc.).
146
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to clearly and positively express their expectations to their children.
147
Participants demonstrate knowledge of realistic expectations for their children's behavior.
148
Participants encourage their children's positive behaviors.
149
Participants verbalize their positive regard for their children to their children and others.
150
Participants spend time daily interacting positively with their children.
151
Participants maintain consistent, predictable, and developmentally appropriate routines for their children (waking and bedtimes, meals, homework, etc.).
152
Participants model behaviors that they wish for their children to adopt (cooperative problem-solving and negotiating, helping others, keeping commitments, etc.).
153
Participants express their expectations to their children clearly and positively.
154
Participants maintain a set of developmentally appropriate and reason-based limits and expectations for their children's behaviors.
155
Participants coach and positively assist their children to understand and follow household rules and expectations.
156
Participants use nonviolent and effective consequences and/or guidance when their children do not follow rules.
157
Participants correct and redirect their children's inappropriate behaviors without corporal punishment or coercion.
158
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the importance of monitoring and supervising their children from infancy through adolescence.
159
Participants demonstrate knowledge of when it is reasonable to give a child additional responsibilities and liberties.
160
Participants demonstrate knowledge of appropriate methods to monitor and supervise according to the children's ages, individual needs, and behaviors and the resources available to the parents.
161
Participants can see or hear their infants at any given time (unless the children are in the care of another responsible adult).
162
Participants appropriately monitor and supervise their children according to the children's developmental levels and individual needs.
163
Participants have child-safe inside and outside play areas that meet their children's developmental levels and individual needs.
164
Participants are aware of where and/or with whom their children are at all times.
165
Participants know and are comfortable with the members of any household their children visit.
166
Participants demonstrate knowledge of their children's particular medical conditions, developmental delays, or other special needs.
167
Participants demonstrate knowledge of their role in participating in their children's treatment/therapy plans.
168
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the appropriate treatments/therapies needed to support their children's optimal development.
169
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the potential effects on themselves and the family members of children with special needs (and therefore are more inclined to seek respite or services for the entire family).
170
Participants demonstrate knowledge and appreciation of their children's strengths and abilities.
171
Participants demonstrate knowledge of realistic expectations associated with their children's medical, developmental, or other special needs.
172
Participants access appropriate services (medical, educational, mental health, etc.) needed to support their children's optimal development.
173
Participants ensure that their children with special needs have opportunities to engage in social activities with their peers.
174
Participants support their children's growth and development by following recommended treatment procedures at home.
175
Participants demonstrate knowledge of where to access appropriate physical, occupational, or mental health therapy.
176
Participants demonstrate knowledge of where to access respite care.
177
Participants demonstrate knowledge of where and how to access low-cost medications or any adaptive equipment their children may need.
178
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the purpose of IEP, IFSP, or treatment planning meetings and how they can participate effectively.
179
Participants demonstrate knowledge of special education resources (e.g., Public Law 94-142) and other resources (such as financial assistance, advocacy, and legal assistance) for which their children with special needs qualify.
180
Participants can list where to go in the community for assessment and evaluation.
181
Participants meet with teachers routinely to ensure that their children are benefiting from the educational services provided.
182
Participants attend IEP meetings and effectively advocate for their children's educational needs.
183
Participants ensure that their children have access to the adaptive equipment appropriate to their children's needs.
184
Participants ensure that their children with special needs receive the physical, occupational, or social emotional therapy they need.
185
Participants participate in staffings, treatment planning, and clinical meetings with medical, mental health, education, or other professionals who are responsible for providing care for their children with special needs.
186
Participants receive respite services as needed.
187
Participants have opportunities to participate in social recreational activities of their choice.
188
Participants have friends or family to assist them with caregiving tasks.
189
Participants have opportunities to participate in support programs for families of children with special needs.
190
Participants experience reduced stress as it relates to caring for their children with special needs.
191
Participants recognize and discuss with others their children's good qualities, abilities, needs, and contributions.
192
Participants demonstrate positive regard and feelings towards their children with special needs.
193
Participants have strong, positive relationships with their children with special needs.
194
Participants have supportive relationships with their family members.
195
Participants demonstrate knowledge of which of their children's behaviors should be targeted for intervention.
196
Participants recognize and acknowledge their children's positive attributes and behaviors.
197
Participants accurately describe the settings in which the targeted behaviors most often occur.
198
Participants accurately describe the behaviors targeted for intervention, including their frequency, duration, and intensity.
199
Participants accurately describe appropriate behaviors that could replace the targeted behaviors (competing behaviors).
200
Participants demonstrate knowledge of possible reasons for children's inappropriate behaviors.
201
Participants demonstrate knowledge of appropriate and effective methods for encouraging their children's positive behaviors.
202
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to structure their children's environment to facilitate positive behaviors.
203
Participants demonstrate knowledge of when to seek outside help with their children's behaviors.
204
Participants demonstrate knowledge of appropriate, effective, and nonabusive methods of reducing negative behaviors.
205
Participants demonstrate knowledge of where they can go for help with their children's behaviors.
206
Participants seek outside help with their children's behaviors as needed.
207
Participants structure their children's environment to facilitate positive behaviors.
208
Participants practice appropriate, effective, and nonabusive methods of discouraging their children's negative behaviors.
209
Participants practice appropriate and effective methods for encouraging their children's positive behaviors.
210
Participants instruct/inform others of effective methods for reducing their children's inappropriate behaviors (i.e., other family members, caregivers, and childcare and school personnel).
211
Children demonstrate confidence and an affect appropriate to the situation/circumstance.
212
Children use positive methods to initiate interactions with others.
213
Children's inappropriate behaviors (such as age inappropriate tantrums, self-destructive behavior, suicidal behavior; bullying, disorganization, inattentiveness, and wandering) are reduced in frequency, duration, and intensity.
214
Children articulate or otherwise express their needs in appropriate ways.
215
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the developmental "red flags" that indicate a need for further assessment.
216
Participants demonstrate knowledge of typical developmental sequences for infants.
217
Participants demonstrate knowledge of healthy brain development (brain architecture).
218
Participants identify developmentally appropriate activities and materials appropriate for fostering physical development.
219
Participants identify developmentally appropriate activities and materials appropriate for fostering cognitive development.
220
Participants provide developmentally appropriate activities that foster social/emotional development.
221
Participants identify developmentally appropriate activities and materials appropriate for fostering language and literacy development.
222
Participants correctly identify their children's verbal and nonverbal cues.
223
Participants describe a daily routine that provides their infants or children with ample time for rest, nourishment, and play.
224
Participants correctly identify appropriate responses to their children's verbal and nonverbal cues.
225
Participants provide developmentally appropriate activities and materials appropriate for fostering language and literacy development.
226
Participants provide developmentally appropriate activities and materials appropriate for fostering physical development.
227
Participants provide a daily routine that provides their infants and children with ample time for rest, nourishment, and play.
228
Participants respond appropriately to their children's verbal and nonverbal cues.
229
Participants read with their children daily.
230
Participants provide developmentally appropriate activities and materials appropriate for fostering cognitive development.
231
Participants identify developmental milestones and the age range when the milestones generally occur.
232
Participants demonstrate knowledge of when it is reasonable to expect children to perform daily tasks such as dressing, eating, and using the toilet unassisted.
233
Participants identify developmental "red flags" that may indicate a need for developmental assessment.
234
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to access information on typical development.
235
Participants demonstrate knowledge of when it is reasonable to expect children to develop and exercise social skills such as sharing, playing games with rules, and delaying gratification.
236
Participants access reference materials and other information on child development as needed.
237
Participants provide opportunities, encouragement, and support for their children to develop and exercise social skills such as sharing, playing games involving rules, and delaying gratification when it is developmentally appropriate to do so.
238
Parents do not use punishments, humiliation, or harsh criticism towards their children when they do not meet the parents' expectations for developmental achievement.
239
Participants demonstrate knowledge of their children's emerging developmental stages and plan activities accordingly.
240
Participants demonstrate knowledge of which developmental milestones their children have achieved.
241
Participants provide opportunities, encouragement, and support for their children to develop daily living skills when it is developmentally appropriate to do so.
242
Participants identify "red-flags" in their children's development and seek professional assistance and help as needed.
243
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the cognitive/educational/literacy milestones of children.
244
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the importance of routinely spending time positively interacting with their children and how that time contributes to their children's cognitive/educational/literacy achievement.
245
Participants identify developmentally appropriate materials and activities they can provide their children to encourage optimal learning.
246
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the importance of and how to assist and encourage their children to do well in school (assist with homework, school attendance, coming to class prepared, etc.).
247
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the importance of reading to and with their children and can select age-appropriate reading materials.
248
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to interact confidently and effectively with teachers.
249
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the importance of and how to monitor their children's television viewing.
250
Participants interact confidently and effectively with teachers.
251
Participants provide developmentally appropriate materials, activities, and parental support to encourage optimal learning.
252
Participants demonstrate knowledge of their children's cognitive/educational/literacy achievements and emerging skills.
253
Participants read developmentally appropriate materials to and with their children.
254
Participants routinely spend time interacting positively with their children.
255
Participants monitor their children's television viewing.
256
Participants help their children to do well in school by assisting with homework and encouraging attendance and preparation for class.
257
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the characteristics of a healthy parent-child attachment.
258
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the benefits to child and parent of a healthy attachment.
259
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how healthy parent-child attachments can be developed and maintained.
260
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the risks associated with lack of or unhealthy parent/child attachments.
261
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the conditions that jeopardize the formation and/or maintenance of healthy attachments.
262
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the verbal and nonverbal cues infants use to express their needs.
263
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the basic survival needs of infants and children.
264
Participants understand the relationship between meeting their infants' needs and attachment (bonding).
265
Participants demonstrate knowledge of appropriate parental responses to infant cues.
266
Participants provide infants with age-appropriate toys, play materials, and activities.
267
Participants respond immediately when infants express distress.
268
Participants demonstrate that they can accurately read infant cues.
269
Participants respond to infants' vocalizations with verbal responses.
270
Participants soothe infants when infants are distressed.
271
Participants provide custodial care (diapering, feeding, bathing, and clothing) while positively interacting with infants.
272
Participants feed infants when they express hunger and stop feeding when they demonstrates satiation.
273
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the traditions that are significant to their family and culture that they wish to preserve in their own families.
274
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the importance of establishing and maintaining traditions and social activities that are important to their family and culture (such as birthdays, religious holidays, weddings, and other celebrations).
275
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the importance of following family routines (predictable mealtimes, wake-up and bedtime routines, family meetings, etc.).
276
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the importance of teaching their children family history.
277
Participants follow family system routines (predictable mealtimes, wake-up and bedtime routines, family meetings, and time together).
278
Participants tell their children their family history, including stories about their ancestors and their lands of origin.
279
Participants establish and maintain traditions and social activities that are significant to their family and culture (such as birthdays, religious holidays, weddings, and celebrations of accomplishments and significant cultural events.
280
Fathers demonstrate knowledge of the importance of being involved in their children's education (attending school conferences, meeting with teachers, assisting with homework, etc.).
281
Fathers demonstrate knowledge of how to assist children in feeding, clothing, bathing, diapering, and other custodial duties according to the children's ages and needs.
282
Fathers demonstrate knowledge of age-appropriate play and recreational activities they can do with their children.
283
Fathers demonstrate knowledge of the importance of being involved in their children's sports and play.
284
Fathers are involved in their children's education (attending school conferences, meeting with teachers, assisting with homework, etc.).
285
Fathers assist in feeding, clothing, bathing, diapering, and other custodial duties according to the children's ages and needs.
286
Noncustodial fathers keep all visitation appointments with their children.
287
Fathers routinely participate in age-appropriate play and other recreational activities with their children.
288
Fathers demonstrate knowledge of the importance of contributing to the economic support of their families.
289
Fathers demonstrate knowledge of the importance of establishing paternity.
290
Noncustodial fathers demonstrate knowledge of effective and positive communication skills for interacting with their children's mother and negotiating visitation and child support payments.
291
Fathers demonstrate knowledge of effective and positive communication skills for working cooperatively with their children's mother to establish house rules and expectations for their children.
292
Fathers contribute to the economic support of their families.
293
Fathers work cooperatively with their children's mother to establish house rules and expectations for their children.
294
Noncustodial fathers practice effective and positive communication skills for interacting with their children's mother and negotiating visitation and child support payments.
295
Noncustodial fathers develop parenting and child support payment plans in cooperation with the children's mother and the courts, if applicable.
296
Fathers establish paternity when paternity is in doubt.
297
Couples demonstrate knowledge of the elements that make up a healthy marriage/relationship.
298
Couples demonstrate knowledge of the behaviors and conditions that undermine healthy marriages/relationships.
299
Individuals in the relationship demonstrate knowledge of the need for each to have their own separate interests and activities.
300
Couples can describe the disadvantages an unhealthy two-parent family can have for children.
301
Couples can describe the advantages a healthy two-parent family has for children.
302
Couples develop a plan for strengthening their marriage/relationship.
303
Couples inventory their marriage/relationship and list its strengths and challenges.
304
Couples agree on limits and rules for their children.
305
Couples demonstrate knowledge of what a commitment to their children entails.
306
Couples demonstrate knowledge of one another's need for intimacy and emotional support.
307
Couples demonstrate knowledge of what a commitment to their relationship entails.
308
Couples experiencing conflicts that involve violence or threats of violence seek assistance.
309
Couples plan to spend time together engaged in activities they both enjoy (they have fun together).
310
Couples demonstrate knowledge of how to communicate effectively and respectfully with one another.
311
Couples demonstrate knowledge of how to settle conflicts respectfully, fairly and to the satisfaction of both parties.
312
Couples communicate effectively and respectfully with one another.
313
Couples support each other's efforts to maintain limits and rules for their children.
314
Couples demonstrate a commitment to their children.
315
Couples give one another the intimacy and emotional support needed by each partner.
316
Couples report a commitment to their relationship.
317
Individuals in the relationship have their own separate interests and activities.
318
Couples spend time together engaged in activities they both enjoy.
319
Couples resolve conflicts respectfully, fairly, and to the satisfaction of both parties.
320
Couples live in violence-free households.
321
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how reliable, safe, and appropriate friends, family members, and neighbors can provide their families with support when they need it.
322
Participants demonstrate knowledge of their personal needs for support.
323
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how they can assist friends, family, and neighbors with support when they need it.
324
Participants demonstrate knowledge of when support from family, friends, and neighbors becomes dependence.
325
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the limits on how much help/time they can afford to give to others in their support networks.
326
Participants set reasonable limits on the help/time they can give to others in their support networks.
327
Participants ask reliable, safe, and appropriate friends, family members, and neighbors for support and assistance when they need it.
328
Participants develop plans to meet their families needs without outside assistance when they have the capacity to do so in order to not become overly dependant on the help of others.
329
Participants demonstrate knowledge of family needs that can best be met through community organizations or agencies.
330
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to access needed services available to them in the community.
331
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the array of services available to them in the community.
332
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the support they can receive from a church, synagogue, mosque, other religious association, or secular support group.
333
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the Federal, State, and local entitlement programs for which they qualify and where to go to apply for them.
334
Participants demonstrate knowledge of their own abilities to meet theirs and their families needs independently.
335
Participants are affiliated with a church, synagogue, mosque, other religious association, or secular support group that they turn to for support when they need it.
336
Participants complete the necessary paperwork and/or interviews necessary to qualify for services.
337
Participants reduce their reliance on formal support systems when they have the capacity to meet their family's needs independently.
338
Participants contact the agencies that are most likely to help them meet their family's needs.
339
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to find high-quality, reliable childcare.
340
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to effectively search for employment with livable wages.
341
Participants demonstrate knowledge of where to go and how to access adult education and job preparation services as needed.
342
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to comparison shop for food, services, and household goods to stay within budgets.
343
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to develop and manage a household budget.
344
Participants demonstrate knowledge of where they can access clothing, food, medications, and shelter in emergency situations.
345
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how to obtain safe and affordable housing.
346
Participants obtain safe and affordable housing.
347
Participants access emergency clothing, food, medications, and shelter in emergency situations as needed.
348
Participants access adult education and job preparation services as needed.
349
Participants access high-quality, reliable childcare when needed.
350
Participants who are able, needing work, and/or looking for a better job obtain and maintain employment with a living wage.
351
Participants who are able and need work actively, sincerely, and competently conduct employment searches.
352
Participants comparatively shop for food, services, and household goods to stay within budgets.
353
Participants develop and manage a household budget.
354
Individuals in the community understand how programs such as parks, playgroups, health clinics, energy assistance programs, parent education classes, and respite programs can reduce the incidence of child maltreatment.
355
Individuals in the community believe that the community can play a role in helping families raise children in safe, nurturing environments.
356
Individuals in the community understand how substance abuse treatment can reduce the incidence of child maltreatment.
357
Individuals in the community understand that access to medical care (including mental health services) can reduce the incidence of child maltreatment.
358
Individuals in the community understand that knowledge of effective parenting skills can decrease the incidence of maltreatment.
359
Individuals in the community understand that parental stress can increase the incidence of child maltreatment.
360
Individuals in the community know when and how to report suspected abuse and neglect.
361
Individuals in the community understand that social support from friends and family can reduce the incidence of child maltreatment.
362
Individuals in the community volunteer for programs that promote healthy families and children (such as recreation programs, parks, playgroups, health clinics, energy assistance programs, parent education classes, and respite programs).
363
Local businesses make in-kind or financial contributions to programs that promote healthy families and children (such as recreation programs, parks, playgroups, health clinics, energy assistance programs, parent education classes, and respite programs).
364
Individuals in the community make in-kind or financial contributions to programs that promote healthy families and children (such as recreation programs, parks, playgroups, health clinics, energy assistance programs, parent education classes, and respite programs).
365
The faith community offers space, financial support, and/or volunteer programs to assist family support programs.
366
Local newspapers contain stories related to family-strengthening programs for children and families.
367
Public and private agencies have policies in place that support meaningful partnerships with parents.
368
Public and private agencies make appropriate referrals to families as needed.
369
Public and private organizations communicate with other helping agencies to coordinate and enhance family strengthening activities.
370
Public and private agencies help parents actively participate in agency decision-making activities. Agencies assist with childcare and transportation needs, schedule meetings to accommodate parents' schedules, etc.
371
Public and private agencies include parents on their advisory boards.
372
Public and private agencies understand the benefits of developing meaningful partnerships with parents.
373
Public and private agencies identify ways that they can offer supports or make appropriate referrals to families as needed.
374
Public and private agencies are familiar with support services available to families.
375
Public and private agencies identify ways to promote parent involvement in agency decision-making activities.
376
Parents adjust their schedules to have time for participation in parenting groups/other prevention-related activities.
377
Parents report feeling confident that their contributions to parenting groups/other prevention-related activities will be taken seriously by group leaders/facilitators.
378
Parents report confidence in their abilities to offer meaningful contributions (such as opinions, suggestions, critical observations) to parenting groups/other prevention-related activities.
379
Parents regularly attend parenting groups/other prevention-related activities.
380
Parents demonstrate respect for the opinions/suggestions/critical observations of other parents and group facilitators.
381
Parents contribute their opinions/suggestions/critical observations to parenting groups/other prevention-related activities.
382
Parents have sufficient knowledge to meaningfully participate on advisory boards and committees.
383
Parents report feeling welcome to participate on advisory boards and committees.
384
Parents report feeling confident that their contributions to advisory boards and committees will be taken seriously.
385
Parents report feeling confident enough to contribute ideas to advisory boards and committees.
386
Parents understand that childcare, transportation, and work leave issues will affect their level of participation when serving on a board.
387
Parents know how to volunteer to participate on advisory boards and committees.
388
Parents advocate for community support of the program via outreach, legislative advocacy, or public awareness.
389
Parents serve on advisory boards and committees, such as boards of directors, curriculum development, and evaluation committees, etc.
390
Parents have the resources and supports in place to participate on advisory boards and committees (such as childcare, transportation, leave from work, etc.).
391
Parents make suggestions for program services/activities.
392
Parents attend organization-wide trainings, conferences, or member meetings.
393
Parents design and implement program activities in partnership with program staff.
394
Parents lead program activities.
395
Parents identify personal boundaries they should establish/maintain in order to participate in a mentoring relationship.
396
Parents express confidence that they have a contribution to make in mentoring other parents (and/or staff).
397
Parents express interest in mentoring other parents (and/or staff).
398
Parents are aware of opportunities to develop mentoring relationships with other parents, agency staff, board members, policy makers or funders.
399
Parents mentor new program participants.
400
Parents mentor new staff.
401
Parents help facilitate other mentoring relationships between parents and other parents, agency staff, board members, policymakers, or funders.
402
Participants demonstrate knowledge of human reproduction.
403
Participants demonstrate knowledge of how subsequent pregnancies will affect their own and their children's lives.
404
Participants attend educational programs at school/local health offices related to the prevention of pregnancy.
405
Participants demonstrate knowledge of effective methods of avoiding subsequent pregnancies (including abstinence).
406
Participants demonstrate knowledge of long-term negative health risks associated with sexually transmitted diseases.
407
Participants attend educational programs at school or local health offices related to the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases.
408
Participants demonstrate knowledge of responsible methods of avoiding sexually transmitted diseases (including abstinence).
409
Participants identify the types of social functions and venues where they are likely to meet individuals with whom they are likely to develop healthy relationships.
410
Participants identify the characteristics of a healthy relationship with peers.
411
Participants understand the dynamics of peer pressure.
412
Participants identify appropriate (safe, healthy) activities that they can engage in with their peers.
413
Participants identify characteristics that indicate a situation or individual that may place the participant in danger (date rape, exposure to illegal drugs, involvement in criminal activities, etc.).
414
Participants know how to avoid negative peer pressure.
415
Participants participate in social functions where they are likely to meet peers with whom they could develop healthy relationships.
416
Participants feel confident that they can be involved in healthy relationships with peers.
417
Participants routinely engage in age-appropriate activities with their peers.
418
Participants avoid situations and individuals that may place them in danger (for date rape, exposure to illegal drugs, involvement in criminal activities, etc.).
419
Participants enroll in high school or GED preparation classes.
420
Participants have made childcare arrangements with appropriate caregivers (including back-up caregivers).
421
Participants are confident that they will be able to complete their high school education.
422
Participants know how to access assistance from family, community, or school (such as tutors and homework support hotlines) to ensure passing grades for completion of school work.
423
Participants develop a schedule that ensures they can attend school while still meeting their child(ren)'s needs.
424
Participants attend school daily when they and their children are in good health, and they have caregivers for the provision of safe childcare.
425
Participants complete homework on time.
426
Participants access assistance from family, community, or school (such as tutors and homework support hotlines) for study support as needed.
427
Participants graduate from high school or obtain GED certification.
428
Participants demonstrate knowledge of the benefits of a postsecondary education.
429
Participants identify their academic interests and strengths.
430
Participants complete the high school courses necessary to prepare themselves for secondary education.
431
Participants apply to postsecondary education institutions.
432
Participants develop a realistic plan for financing their postsecondary education.
433
Participants enroll in a postsecondary education institution.
434
Participants have the resources needed to pay for school and to provide for themselves and their child(ren).
435
Participants are accepted into a postsecondary educational institution.
436
Participants express their intentions to refrain from behaviors that could result in pregnancy.
437
For young men: Participants do not cause subsequent pregnancies.
438
For young women: Participants do not experience subsequent pregnancies.
439
Participants do not contract any sexually transmitted diseases.

 
 
Friends Logo The Logic Model Builder was a collaborative effort between the FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention (www.friendsnrc.org), who developed the content, and the National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information (nccanch.acf.hhs.gov), who created the database.